Library Books Create Protected Areas For College students Throughout The Pandemic : NPR

It has been a 12 months since lecturers have been handed an unprecedented request: Educate college students in totally new methods, amid the backdrop of a world pandemic. On this comedian sequence, we'll illustrate one educator's story every week from now till the top of the varsity 12 months.

Episode 6

Librarian Emily Curtis and bus driver Edwin Steer of Georgetown, Texas, talk about creating locations of "peace and safety" by delivering books to college students who cannot be at school.

"Usually, my library is really bustling, and there are tons of kids in it. It's been much more quiet. I miss being able to be that place of peace and security." - Emily Curtis, librarian
"Now, the biggest way kids get their books is by putting them on hold. I have a little wagon, and I go around at the end of every day and deliver them to all of the language arts teachers."
"I had one kid say it was like Christmas. 'Yes! It's the book I've been waiting for!'"
"Our first three weeks were completely remote, and we really wanted to make sure kids at home had access to print books.We put them in brown paper bags, and they would get picked up by one of the bus drivers."
"My supervisor gives me a list of all the students' addresses, and I make my own route. The longest it's taken me is about an hour and a half. I'm really happy to be a part of it." - Edwin Steer, bus driver
"I know the kids miss being at school, being present with their friends. Getting the books delivered from the library, they feel like they're still involved with the school."
"One of the things that a library offers is escape and comfort through books, whether it's seeing someone else in your own situation or escaping to a world that's completely different from the one that we're experiencing right now."
"I do worry about those kids who are home alone. We hope for the best, but being able to send [a book] home – it's a little world that they can go off and enjoy."
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Eda Uzunlar/NPR
"I do worry about those kids who are home alone. We hope for the best, but being able to send [a book] home – it's a little world that they can go off and enjoy."

Eda Uzunlar/NPR

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